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Meet Our Doctors

Dr. Joan Evinger is a Southern Indiana native. She has been associated with veterinary medicine since 1958 when she started volunteering at a local veterinary office. After graduation from Our Lady of Providence High School, she entered the pre-veterinary curriculum at Purdue University. In 1967, after being elected to Phi Zeta (a scholastic honorary society), and earning her D.V.M. degree from Purdue, she returned home to practice. After 12 years of practice, she took a 2 ½-year sabbatical to study small animal internal medicine at Purdue. Her solo practice started in 1985 when she returned home from Purdue. Care-Pets Animal Hospital and Wellness Center has been at its present location since 2001.

In 2004, Dr. Evinger's husband brought their first bird home. This started an avian infatuation that has lead to expanding the practice to include birds. Avian medicine, surgery, and behavior take a large portion of her continuing education time. In addition, Dr. Evinger attends the national Association of Avian Veterinarians conference every year.

Dr. Evinger's Professional Memberships include:

When not engaged in professional pursuits, Dr. Evinger enjoys traveling, canoeing, hiking, camping, hunting, reading and singing in the church choir. She also enjoys spending quality, quiet time with her bird, Aurora, a Patagonian Conure.


Dr. Courtney Smock grew up in Greencastle, Indiana, with a houseful of dogs, cats, and horses, and a herd of mischievous goats for neighbors. She adventured out to the east coast for her undergraduate studies where she attended Smith College, then returned to Purdue to earn her veterinary degree in 2010. After vet school she moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico with her husband Dr. David Rowland, who was serving as a veterinarian for the US Army. While there, she worked in private practice for a few years before deciding to pursue a small animal rotating internship to advance her skills and knowledge.

Upon returning to Indiana in 2013, she took a job as an emergency clinician in Louisville, where she worked until early 2016 when she was invited to join the Care-Pets team. She is excited to be back in daytime practice where she can get to know you and your furry family!

Dr. Smock's Professional Memberships include:

When she is not caring for your critters, she enjoys hanging around the house with the pets (two cats Mietze and Max, Chester the Dog, and The Husband), cooking, craft brewing, yoga, and getting together with her Little Sister from Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Thursdays are senior discount days. 10% discount on procedures for senior clients (65+) or senior pets (7+).

Office Hours

Monday:

8 - 12

2 - 6

Tuesday:

8 - 12

2 - 6

Wednesday:

8 - 12

2 - 6

Thursday:

8 - 12

2 - 6

Friday:

8 - 12

2 - 6

Saturday:

8 - 12

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

Location

Testimonials

  • "Dr. Evinger is the most caring and informed vet I have ever taken my dogs to. She has always taken such great care of them and she genuinely cares about animals. I would recommend her and her wonderful staff to anyone."
    Milda Grooms
  • "It is obvious they care both for animals and people, and they do a good job of it!"
    Mark Johnson
  • "I would like to give a big shout out to Dr Joan and the Care Pets team. They took excellent care of our Rebel in his thirteen years of life."
    Sandy Higgins

Featured Articles

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    The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis which can be due to wear and tear on joints from over use, aging, injury, or from an unstable joint such as which occurs with a ruptured ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) in the knee. The chronic form of this disease is called degenerative joint disease ...

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